“Post-Baby Body” B.S.

“Post-Baby Body” B.S.

Post. Baby. Body. 

Three little words. But a whole lot of angst.

I live an interesting conundrum through my work. As someone who works in the field of post-natal rehabilitation and recovery, I talk a LOT about post-baby bodies. But I also rail against the tidal wave of “post-baby body” messages that engulf new mothers – those messages that come from mainstream media, social media, friends, family, fitspo-instagram “experts”, dodgy personal trainers, and society at large. The sort of messages that impress upon women the importance of  “losing the baby weight”, and “becoming a yummy mummy”. I don’t buy into any of that BS. Because, it’s BS. It doesn’t matter how you look – what matters is how you feel, and how you function. #formoverfunction

When I talk about “post-baby bodies”, I’m talking about restoring “function” to our bodies after the rigours of pregnancy and childbirth. But by and large, the post-baby body discussions in the media and society are about our body’s “form”. What it looks like, whether it’s firm and perky or soft and droopy.

It’s an unfortunate truth that women face immense pressure to get “beach body ready”, almost as soon as we’ve popped out our little munchkin. There is such a strong message in the media around the importance of getting back into your bikini as soon as possible after childbirth. But why? I’ve never worn a bikini in my life, and I’m not desperate to get into one now, so perhaps I’m a bit biased. But it’s something that gets on my last post-natal wellbeing nerve. I’ve written about it before here.

The “post baby body” message is pervasive. 

Whenever I start working with a new Mum for post-natal support I always ask them about their goals. I can honestly say that every single one of them will mention something about “losing the baby weight”.

What I’m really curious about is why women feel so compelled to “lose the baby weight” as their number one priority. I get that weight loss is a goal for many of us – myself included. But I wonder why it’s so difficult for so many of us to accept these natural postnatal changes. Why is it so important to get our pre-baby “form” back super quick? And why is it more of a priority than getting our pre-baby “function” back?

So in an effort to shift the conversation, and to tip the balance in the favour of “function” over “form”, I’m sharing my list of top four post-baby body goals that are way more important than “losing the baby weight”.

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1. Restoring your posture and body alignment.

Nine months of hefting around a growing uterus does terrible things for our posture! As our baby bump grows, it naturally changes our centre of gravity, meaning that our body will frequently shift into abnormal positions to counter-balance that bump. This can lead to a completely unbalanced postnatal body – some muscles are overstretched, other muscles are too tight. We call these “upper and lower crossed syndromes”.

But it doesn’t end there! Once that little bundle of joy is out of our belly, we face the additional physical demands of lifting, carrying, feeding, handling and caring for an infant (not to mention the added manual handing of lugging around heavy strollers, capsules and nappy bags). It’s also worth noting that much of this manual handling is done in an asymmetrical fashion – such as always carrying our nappy bag on the same shoulder, or carrying our baby on the same hip. So our unbalanced, out-of-alignment bodies continue to be unbalanced and out of alignment – and they rarely get the chance to re-calibrate to a natural posture post-baby. They often need support and we need to consciously retrain ourselves back to a proper posture and alignment.

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2: Restoring your core strength – and recovering from abdominal separation

When our bellies start entering rooms before we do, it places our poor little abdominal muscles under great strain. For many women, this leads to a condition called “diastasis recti”, commonly known as abdominal separation. This occurs when all of the abdominal muscles are stretched to such an extent, that the two bellies of the Rectus Abdominis muscle (the 6-pack muscle) pull apart from each other. The ligament that holds these two parts of the muscle together (the linea alba), can stretch a great distance, and in extreme cases, can even tear or rupture. Once the baby is born, it can take some time for this separation to return to (or close to) it’s original alignment. Until it does, our abdominal strength and function can be compromised.

Diastasis-Recti-Abdominis-Burrell

But core strength isn’t just about our abs. Postnatal women also need to consider the impact of pregnancy and childbirth on all of their abdominal muscles (not just the Rectus Abdominis), their back muscles, as well as their diaphragm, breathing technique, and of course the pelvic floor. Because all of these structures have a role in maintaining our core strength and integrity, and they all need to work together, in perfect harmony, to encourage great core strength. Check out the image below, for a great representation of how the abdominal and back muscles, along with the diaphragm and pelvic floor, combine to create the “core”.

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3. Restoring your pelvic floor.

Actually, I really should have made this number one. If you don’t want to be stocking up on the Tena Lady products by the time you hit your 40s, you’re going to need to focus on pelvic floor recovery asap! I think most post-natal women understand the importance of this by now. But understanding doesn’t necessarily lead to action. And when you consider the statistics that 45pc of women still experience incontinence issues seven years post-birth, it’s clear that many women aren’t doing all they should! And for the record, good pelvic floor rehab is about more than just doing your Kegel exercises. It’s also about restoring your posture and alignment (see above), restoring your core strength, improving your breathing technique and learning how to functionally engage your pelvic floor during all kinds of activities. Yes, there’s more to it than “just do your pelvic floor exercise”.

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So, here are three of my “top four post-baby body goals”. But really, they’re actually just ONE goal. Did you notice how in each section, I mentioned each of the other two items. Because pelvic floor, core strength, posture – they’re all one and the same really. An issue in one will create an issue with all. So to repair one, we need to work on restoring them all. The body doesn’t segment itself the way we think it does. It’s one big integrated unit that should work together in perfect harmony with itself. When you figure out how your body really works – from a whole body perspective, you start to understand how best to “get your pre-baby body” back in a functional sense, rather than a pants size sense.

But what about point number 4: Learning how to accept your baby body – whatever it looks like?

Easier said than done right? I know I’m currently struggling with this personally. To be honest – I’m actually heavier now than I was at full term during either of my pregnancies. So yes, I had my “pre baby body” back – but then I lost it again. I know it’s not ideal, and there are several reasons behind it, which I’m currently working on – namely addressing the adrenal fatigue that has smashed me for these past two years. Every day is a body challenge for me. Exhaustion is a tricky beast to describe and explain to someone who’s never experienced. I’ve written before about how I so badly wanted to want to run, to work out, to push my body harder. But I simply couldn’t. It’s only really been the past several weeks that I’ve again felt strong and energised enough to start jogging again, which is a great win for me.

I lost a lot of confidence in my body through those two years, and I see-sawed between being angry at my body for letting me down, and being angry at myself for letting my body down. And of course this kind of anger isn’t particularly productive! But the one thing I can be confident of is this – even though I’ve gained weight, and lost cardio fitness in the past two years, my body has stayed functional. I haven’t struggled with pelvic floor issues, or poor core strength, and I believe I can attribute this to my postnatal recovery efforts. I put in the work in those early days after each of my babies and it’s given me a solid foundation to keep moving through this challenging body period. Because effective rehab is useful at, and for, any size.

If you’re a new mum, are you keen to know more and to start really focusing on rehabbing your “post-baby body”? If so please check out my postnatal wellbeing program, Body Mind Baby. Our next five week course is being held in Adelaide (West Lakes), starting on Wednesday June 7. You can book online here.

Please feel free to share with any other new mums who you think may be interested.

Please feel free to email me at sarah@bloomwellbeing.com.au if you have any questions.

I’m looking forward to helping you get post-baby rehabbed!

Until next time,

Cheers Sarah xx

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No, you don’t need a “Pilates Body” to do Pilates.

No, you don’t need a “Pilates Body” to do Pilates.

I’m a Pilates Instructor. I have a body.

But I do not have what would be considered a “Pilates Body”. I don’t really have to explain what a “Pilates Body” looks like, just type the words “Pilates Body” into Google images and see what the internet spits back at you.

I do not look like ANY of those images. Actually, sorry I take that back – there’s a few ‘before and after’ shots on the page, and my body probably does resemble some of those before shots.

In case we haven’t met before, here’s a picture of my Pilates Body (minus my head, which is what happens when a three year old gets hold of the camera!) I know it’s not really important that you know what I look like, but maybe it helps, so here you go:

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Check that lack of six pack, that lack of thigh gap, the squooshy boobs in an ill-fitting sports bra (it must have been laundry day!). I’d also really like to thank Miss Three for the shocking angle of this image. You’d never see a Pilates marketing photo from this angle!

In fact, when it comes to Pilates Body internet imagery you don’t even need to type the word “body”, just type “Pilates” into an image search and this is the body you’ll find. Young, blonde, female, long and lean. You’d be forgiven for thinking the only people who can or do practice Pilates are Australia’s Next Top Model contestants.

Why, when we type Pilates, don’t we see more women with bodies like mine? Or images of the 14 year old girl in her school sports uniform doing Pilates to address her scoliosis, or the 50 year old truck driver doing Pilates to recover from his back injury, or the 70 year old woman doing Pilates to keep strong after her osteoporosis diagnosis? And I know we see lots of pregnant bellies in crop tops and “Mummy and Me” Pilates – but those Mums are, by and large, quite “yummy” – there’s rarely any new Mums pictured in beige maternity bras with baby spew down their shirt and dark circles under their eyes due to lack of sleep. It’s all matching crop tops and leggings with bouncy pony tails and no hint of a “mum-tum” at all.

Pilates has an image problem. And the problem is the general public is only being presented with one image of Pilates.

Part of this is due to the fact that Pilates instructors are, overwhelmingly “Pilates Bodies” types – but that is slowly changing – here’s just a selection of a few instructors doing great things to promote body positive Pilates over on Instagram.So hopefully the stereotype of Pilates just being for the beautiful bodies is slowly changing.

But we still have a long way to go – and a lot of that rests on us as instructors to lead the charge. Just as @sixthstreetpilates, @grace.movement.pilates, @pilates.fbg and @sheofdc are doing.

At a women’s health conference I attended recently I was seated next to a lovely Pilates studio owner who did indeed have a ‘Pilates Body’, she was stunning – the workshop we were in was about marketing and naturally we got chatting about marketing our respective studios through social media, branding and imagery. This lovely lady had two studios, and while she said one just ticked along nicely through word of mouth, the second, inner city studio, was all about “the body beautiful”. That was the marketing strategy that drove attendance at that studio.

“It’s all about the body beautiful”, she said, “That’s what the clients want.”

I had to politely disagree. The “body beautiful” is what people who value the body beautiful want. But there are also people who value the “body functional”, the “body pain free”, the “body recovering from pregnancy”, to “body challenged to see what it can perform”, the “body that feels so much more relaxed after this one hour per week to myself”, the “body that just wants to stretch and move”, the “body who likes to hang out with friends in a space that’s not a pub”, or the “body who appreciates mindful movement”.

There are a hundred reasons why someone might start, and continue, a Pilates practice, the least important of which is rock hard abs.

Joseph Pilates, the creator of the Pilates method, wrote a book about his work. He named it “Return to Life Through Contrology*”, not “Return to Booty Through Contrology”. (*Contrology was what Joseph originally called his method, I guess he just wasn’t Kanye enough to personally name it after himself, his protégé’s named the method Pilates after his death.)

Pilates is about moving your body, and restoring it to functional movement patterns so that it can carry you through life. In the words of my lovely friend Taryn Brumfitt, of the Body Image Movement, “My body is not an ornament, it is the vehicle to my dreams”.

So if you have dreams, and you want your body to be strong, flexible and functional, in order to help you achieve them, maybe give Pilates a go. Even if you don’t have (or don’t want) a Pilates Body – you’ll fit in at my studio just fine!

Until next time – Sarah xx

ps. If you are keen to give pilates a go, and you’re close to me in western Adelaide – make sure you check out my “Buy five, get 10” discount – 10 classes for the price of five ($90). To book or check the schedule, click here.

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Pelvic Organ Prolapse – Interview with Heba Shaheed, The Pelvic Expert

Pelvic Organ Prolapse is a serious condition affecting many women, particularly those in the postnatal period. However, it is an often misunderstood, or even unknown, condition to so many.

In a world where so many women of all ages are reluctant to even say the word “vagina” out loud, it’s perhaps unsurprising that a condition affecting a woman’s vagina and the rest of her pelvic region is still not widely spoken about.

Pelvic Organ Prolapse affects one in every two to three postnatal women

But with statistics showing that between 30 to 50pc of postnatal women experiencing a prolapse, this is clearly a topic that needs more awareness.

Particularly because Pelvic Organ Prolapse can have such a significant impact on a woman’s overall physical wellbeing, and her sense of body image, self esteem and mental health – particularly if it is left untreated.

In this interview I speak with Women’s Health Physiotherapist, Heba Shaheed, who provides us with advice on what Pelvic Organ Prolapse is, how and why it occurs and how we can treat and prevent it. Heba has such a wonderful way of explaining this issue and I’m sure you’ll love her ‘balls and rubber bands’ imagery, which makes this topic so much easier to comprehend.

Click the link below to watch:

Great information hey? Heba has such a great knowledge on all areas pelvic health. If you want to connect with her you can find her website here, connect with her on twitter here, or visit her facebook page here.

Want more information?

This video was initially recorded as a bonus content module for the Bloom Wellbeing postnatal wellbeing program, Core Floor Restore. For more information on Core Floor Restore, visit bloomwellbeing.teachable.com/courses/

All about alignment – interview with Dream Life Coach, Soli Goodes

All about alignment – interview with Dream Life Coach, Soli Goodes

Alignment.

If you’ve been hanging around the personal development world at all recently, you’ll know it’s a bit of a buzz word out there right now.

But it’s SO MUCH MORE than a buzz word. It’s actually a really important factor in figuring out who we are as people, what makes us tick, what lights us up, and what we should be doing with our time.

Now, just for the record, in this post, alignment is all about purpose and living a meaningful life, in accordance with your own values, needs and wants. We’re not talking today about the biomechanical alignment of your body parts (though that’s just as important! This is another reason I love the concept of alignment – you get double the bang for your buck with this one little word.

I often see that poor life alignment is “the missing link” for many people. Sometimes, even when everything is “going right” in our lives and we seem to “have it all” with a coveted job, gorgeous partner, happy kids, beautiful home, solid nutrition, great movement habits and focused mindset, we can still feel like something is missing. We can still be unhappy, miserable, anxious, frustrated, even angry. And then of course there’s the guilt. “I have so much, why am I still unhappy? I shouldn’t be so ungrateful, I should try harder to be happy.”

It’s really quite frustrating because outwardly there doesn’t seem to be anything wrong – but we still have that gut feeling that something isn’t quite right. It can often come down to living a life that isn’t in alignment with your core values as a person, and which doesn’t provide you with meaning or fulfilment. It’s something that’s difficult to truly understand, until you start to really dig deep into your own heart and soul, and figure out what you truly WANT out of life, and what truly FEELS right for you, both physically and mentally.

In OT speak, we call this “Meaningful Occupation” – doing the things and roles that are meaningful, purposeful and enjoyable to the individual. In personal development land, they call it alignment. It’s one and the same.

I recently caught up with the wonderful Soli Goodes, Dream Life Coach and owner of Business Goddess to talk all about alignment. This interview was recorded as a bonus feature for the participants in my Busy Woman’s Stress Makeover program, but again I’ve decided to share it for free with everyone. I’m so excited to bring this interview to you as we had so much fun recording it. Honestly, we could have sat there for a couple of hours chatting away, but we’ve done you a favour and kept it to around 20 minutes!

Soli Goodes, Dream Life Coach and director of www.businessgoddess.com.au

Soli Goodes, Dream Life Coach and director of www.businessgoddess.com.au

In the interview we talk about:

  • What alignment is
  • How to tell if you’re living a life out of alignment
  • How to get back on track to being IN alignment

So grab yourself a juice or a cuppa and get comfy to have a listen. And don’t forget to let us know what you think, either in the comments, or on the Bloom Wellbeing facebook page.

Until next time, keep well and live your best life.

Love,

Sarah xx

Is feminism to blame for the Women’s Stress Epidemic?

Is feminism to blame for the Women’s Stress Epidemic?

Why are women so stressed? Why are we getting sicker and sicker? Why are adrenal fatigue, anxiety and depression at an all time high? Why do we now face a concept known as “Rushing Women’s Syndrome”.

Why is the current state of women’s health so poor, when we have more resources than ever to supposedly keep us healthy?

It’s a difficult question to answer and there are so many variables for every woman experiencing overwhelming stress and dysfunction. But there are a few common threads, and in this interview, fellow Occupational Therapist, Jac Edser, and I have a candid discussion about what we see in our practices on a regular basis.

Occupational Therapists, Jac Edser (left) and Sarah Hausler.

Occupational Therapists, Jac Edser (left) and Sarah Hausler.

 

Here’s just a few of the topics we cover in this discussion:

  • Why there is a global stress epidemic facing women at this current time
  • Why women are more susceptible to stress than men
  • How the desire to “have it all” has contributed to our stress epidemic
  • Why the feminist movement has been both friend and foe
  • How we can be more in tune with our “feminine power” and utilise this, rather than trying to create more “masculine” energies which can create stress
  • The link between physical and emotional wellbeing
  • How we can learn to “listen to our bodies” to help attain optimal physical and emotional wellbeing.

(ps. we recorded this interview as a bonus for my Busy Women’s Stress Makeover program, but it’s so good I want to share it with everyone!)

Have a listen below, and don’t forget to let me know what you think of our chat. Did you have any “Aha!” moments. Did it confirm some of your gut feelings about your own life? Or do you disagree completely?

 

Thanks for listening!

Until next time, Live Your Best Life.

Cheers, Sarah xx

How long should a “normal” postnatal recovery be?

How long should a “normal” postnatal recovery be?

How long did it take you to “recover” after you had your babies? Was it six weeks? Six months? A year? When we talk about “post-natal recovery” there’s an awful lot we need to consider.

I read with interest this article from the Daily Mail in UK, which suggested that post-natal recovery timeframes are actually closer to 12 months, a lot more than generic 6 week time frame that is so often bandied about.

I think the issue here is with the definition of “post-natal recovery” – because in my opinion, there’s a lot more to it than simply waiting for your episiotomy wound to heal.

Of course, there’s the “physical recovery” – pelvic floor function and rehab, repairing any abdominal separation (diastasis recti), regaining your core strength and returning your body to a better posture and alignment, addressing any back, neck and shoulder complaints you may have from pregnancy or constantly lifting and carrying your baby, plus whatever other physical issues may have cropped up for you. This is all really important if we want our bodies to be functional for the next 60 odd years, and to not be reliant on incontinence pads in our 40s.

When did you feel "back to normal"?

When did you feel “back to normal”?


Then there’s the “emotional recovery” – adjusting to the role of motherhood and all the feelings that come along with it: fear, anxiety, bewilderment, helplessness, overwhelm, concern, failure, confusion, anger, loss, and guilt that can go along with this. Not to say that all our emotions are negative. There’s also love, joy, passion, gratitude, purpose, connection, fulfilment, and so much more. But you know what – these emotions can be overwhelming too – and it can take us a while to settle into these new feelings and emotions as well.

And what about the “social recovery” which I think is often forgotten, but which can be really challenging for so many women. Adjusting to changed relationships – with your husband or partner, your friends, your own mother. Adjusting to no longer being a worker or bringing in an income. Navigating the maze of postnatal and baby services and making new friends. Redefining who you “really are” now that your a Mum. Feeling like you’ve lost your own identity. Feeling trapped or unable to escape. There’s a lot that happens in the social front – these are all challenges and women often need support to adjust to these changes.

So bearing all of that in mind – how long would you expect it to take to “recover” from childbirth? It’s an intensely personal experience, and it’s about so much more than whether or not you’re “all healed down there”. Some women bounce back from childbirth straight away – both physically and emotionally. Others may take longer to sort through the emotional challenges, others may not notice the physical challenges until after they have their second baby. Some might not notice issues until they decide to go back to work, or until their children start school.

It’s not a precise science, and there’s a lot of factors to consider. But for the majority of women, their postnatal “recovery” continues much longer than their 6 week post baby check up!

Here’s my top five tips for supporting your postnatal recovery:

1) Realise that postnatal recovery involves a LOT of different factors

It’s so much more than just losing the baby bump. I mentioned all the factors above that have an impact on how well we “bounce back” after birth. Take a few minutes to review those areas of your life, and then give yourself a little credit for ALL the adjustments you’re currently dealing with. There’s always more happening than meets the eye – wellbeing involves a lot of different factors.

2) Give yourself time – aka: Please, please, please don’t set yourself deadlines.

I posted on facebook recently about this US Runner who was back training for Olympic trials five weeks after childbirth, despite having a significant abdominal separation and lots of incontinence issues. As a professional athlete, this woman makes her living through running, she’s on a tight timeline when it comes to Olympic trials, and she also has a huge team of health professionals supporting her in her rehab. I’m hopeful she’ll make a full recovery at some point. But I wonder how much faster she might have healed her abdominal separation and pelvic floor issues if she’d had the time to recover properly – without loading her body up with a heavy running schedule while simultaneously trying to rehab. Most of us aren’t professional athletes, so there’s no hard and fast timeline for us to have to recover from.

3) Know what’s “normal” and what’s just common in the postnatal period

There’s a big difference between “common” – as in it happens to lots of new mothers, and what’s “normal” as in what’s the way something “should” be. Some postnatal concerns can be uncomfortable or embarrassing – such as incontinence. And in the rush to make women feel better about these embarrassing conditions we’re quick to reassure them it’s “totally normal, nothing to worry about!” But this does women a huge disservice. Labeling something as “normal”, when it actually isn’t, means that women may think these things are what “should” happen to new mothers, and therefore not seek help to address it. Let’s recognise that issues such as postnatal incontinence, abdominal separation and back pain are “common”, very, very common in fact – but they’re not normal – it’s not how the human body is designed to be. And we can work to address these issues – we just need to be aware that we CAN. #commonnotnormal

4) Get the right professional support

One of my clients last week told me she was considering changing her personal trainer. She’s not 100 percent happy with his level of knowledge on what is and isn’t suitable for postnatal and pregnant women, and after having a few back pain twinges recently, so she’s reconsidering whether he’s the right fit for her. Working with pregnant and postnatal clients requires a detailed understanding of female anatomy, and an excellent knowledge of what is and isn’t appropriate for this group. Make sure you find health professionals (whether it be your physio, personal trainer, or group fitness instructor) who has additional training in pregnancy and postnatal care. Even the best trainer in the world can unintentionally cause damage if they don’t have training in this field.

5) Do the work!

Okay, I admit it. Postnatal rehab can be boooooring! There’s a lot of breathing, a lot of checking your posture and alignment, a lot of repeating the same several exercises with perfect form. I know it can be boring. But it’s effective. It does the job – if you do yours! Rehab only works when the rehabber puts in the yards to do what their therapist asks them. This is true for postnatal women, professional footballers or injured workers. People who follow their rehab programs properly will always recover better than those who don’t. Rehab may not have the same level of exhilaration as an early morning run, or a Body Attack class with your bestie, but those things will always be there. In six weeks, or 12 months, they will still be there. But if you don’t do the work now – if you don’t take the time to make rehab a priority, what might also be there in 12 months is incontinence or abdominal separation – and the long term implications aren’t that much fun. Do the work. It will be worth it, I promise.

What has been your experience? I’m always keen to hear from my readers, so shoot me an email to sarah@bloomwellbeing.com.au if you have any queries or comments.

Until next time, keep well and take the time to rehab properly!

Cheers, Sarah

ps. If you’d like to know more about rehab for motherhood, make sure to check out my Core Floor Restore five week online program. It’s chock full of information about abdominal separation, pelvic floor dysfunction, posture and alignment, back and neck pain, and it’s been specifically created for Mums to support their own understanding of their recovery and wellbeing. Click here to check out the Core Floor Restore program details and pricing.